A very relaxing day at Alice Lake

When Marcus and I went to Alice Lake about two months ago, we were hiking along a trail that let us explore all four lakes there, but as Ben and Tom love being near and in the water a lot, we just packed our picnic box, picnic blankets, swimming things for the boys, my Kindle and our cameras – and off we went to spend a relaxing day at the lake.

Luckily for us, there weren’t many people around so that we could choose a really nice spot to sit. Ben and Tom were very much interested in getting their own kayaks this time after having shared a canoe at Buntzen Lake some days ago. So they rented some kayaks, and immediately went kayaking in them.

After a while they came back – hungry, of course -, had some snacks, went swimming and diving in the water, came back for lunch, took their kayaks out again, came back for some food, went swimming again… They definitely didn’t get bored all day.

Shortly before going home, we even saw those cute Douglas squirrels. Especially one of them was very sneaky as it went into someone else’s bag, retrieved some food from there and sat on one of the benches to enjoy his stolen snack which must have been especially tasty, as the squirrel came back several times to get more of that.

As all of us had so much fun at Alice Lake, it will definitely be on our list of what to do with the boys next year.

(to be continued…)

We have been to Alice Lake

Although the weather forecast predicted a 60% chance of rain today, we nevertheless went to Alice Lake Provincial Park, a most beautiful place to spend a day hiking, geocaching and enjoying nature at its best. In summer this is also a great place for swimming, kayaking and relaxing at the beach. We decided to tackle all four lakes which are, by the way, fresh water lakes, and what better way to do so than hiking along this 6 km Four Lakes Trail that covers, as the name says, all four lakes. After having had some lunch at Alice Lake, where there are plenty of picnic benches available, and seeing a Canada geese family with five goslings at the lake, we headed towards Stump Lake where our official walking tour was about to start. Stump Lake had some beautiful yellow water lilies to admire. Besides we saw so-called floating gardens that are made of sphagnum moss and sedge. Those plants anchor to a fallen log, grow out over the surface and then form such floating gardens. Great, eh? On our way to Fawn Lake we passed a wild creek and made our way towards it. Once there we could not only admire the water paving its way along the little stones but also see those beautiful mountains, still covered in snow. From the creek it was back into the wilderness again, and after an uphill hike we could even see it again from above. On our way we saw a Douglas squirrel which, unfortunately, was too fast to get a picture of and a black wild animal. Well, it was not a black bear, but black and wild it was, this black slug… And then it looked as if we had found a moss covered orca in the woods. It really does look like one, doesn’t it? Along the trail we also saw young ferns and some Cornus canadensis or bunchberries which they are called, too, and which are native to Canada. Finally we arrived at Fawn Lake where quite a few people were resting on some logs in front of it – and we had a rest, too, before continuing our hike to Edith Lake. Once there, we saw some anglers trying to catch some fish. From Edith Lake it was another smaller uphill hike before finally getting onto the long downhill walk to Alice Lake where we passed a little creek, crossed a nice little bridge and enjoyed some tiny waterfalls. Just look at the crystal clear water! Then we stopped to admire this beautiful old stump, and from there it was only a very short walk until we reached Alice Lake where we once again sat on one of those picnic benches – in the sun! – to enjoy some afternoon snack before heading back home. Alice Lake itself is also a very stunning place with its beaches, picnic areas, a great playground – and all that surrounded by mountains and forests. Simply beautiful! On our way back home, we decided quite spontaneously to stop at one of those viewpoints along the route and did get a great view of Watts Point (known as Xelxwelítn, meaning Europeans) and Howe Sound. All in all we had a wonderful day hiking along the most beautiful Four Lakes trail where we could walk in the wild, untouched nature and see lots of Pacific red cedars and Douglas firs, among others. And we also found some geocaches hidden along the trail. Anyway, I especially love those moss covered trees and still can’t believe that we are living in the Pacific temperate rain forests with its lush vegetation. We will definitely be back soon.